Hazards And Vulnerability

Understanding the potential hazards and determining the Pueblo of Sandia’s vulnerability to these hazards provides the basis all emergency planning. Some of the hazards posing the greatest threat to the Pueblo of Sandia include flooding, wildfires and hazardous materials incidents. Click on the links below for fact sheets, videos and Websites with information about the hazards common to our area.

Flooding
floodingFloods are one of the most common hazards, but not all flooding is alike. Flash floods may develop very quickly from excessive rain or a dam break and affect a localized area, while overland flooding may develop slowly and affect entire river basins and multiple states. The following resources will help you prepare for, respond to and recover from a flood.
Wildfires
According to the National Interagency Fire Center, between 2000 and 2012, wildfires burned an average of 7 million acres and cost an average of $1.5 billion each year. The following resources can help you prepare for and recover from a wildfire.
Hazardous Materials
Hazardous materials or chemical threats may come from industrial site incidents, transportation accidents, terrorist attacks and even common household products. The following resources can help you prepare for and recover from a chemical threat.
Winter Weather

Exposure to cold temperatures can cause serious or life-threatening health problems and winter weather can create hazardous driving conditions. The following resources can help you prepare for and recover from severe winter weather.
Severe Heat
According to a 2013 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) study, in the U.S. an average of 658 people per year died of heat related injuries between 1999 and 2009. The following resources can help you prepare for and recover from an extreme heat incident.
  • Prepare for Extreme Heat– Advice from FEMA on what you should do if the weather is extremely hot.
  • Stay Healthy During Extreme Heat – Tips from the Environmental Protection Agency including checking air quality and limiting outside exposure.
  • Extreme Heat– Self-help measures and tips for dealing with periods of extreme heat from the Centers for Disease Control.
  • Heat Wave: A Major Summer Killer– Information from the National Weather Service about the heat index and ways to protect yourself from extreme heat.
  • Heat Wave Safety– Fact sheet on what to do before, during and after a heat wave from the American Red Cross.
Drought
Droughts are one of the most costly natural disasters affecting the U.S. The following resources can help you prepare for and recover from a drought.
  • U.S. Drought Portal – Fact sheets, local news and maps to help you monitor the drought in your area from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
  • National Drought Mitigation Center– The University of Nebraska-Lincoln provides current news and tips on how to plan for a drought.
  • Drought Preparedness and Water Conservation– The American Red Cross provides information on how to conserve water indoors and outdoors.
  • Water Conservation Tips– Information on how to save water in the bathroom, kitchen, laundry and outside the home from the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission.
Tornadoes
Tornadoes come in all shapes and sizes and can occur anywhere in the U.S. at any time of the year. In the southern states, peak tornado season is March through May, while peak months in the northern states are June and July. The following resources can help you prepare for and recover from a tornado.
Earth Quakes
Did you know that 45 states including New Mexico are at a moderate to high risk for earthquakes? Earthquakes can range from mild to devastating and since earthquakes strike with no warning, it is critical that everyone be ready at all times. The following resources can help you prepare for, respond to and recover from an earthquake.
  • Earthquake Preparedness – Advice from the American Red Cross on what to do before, during and after an earthquake.
  • Surviving an Earthquake – Information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention regarding what you need to know to deal with safety issues after an earthquake.
Climate Change
Climate changes pose great challenges to the Southwest, which is the hottest and driest region in the United States where the availability of water has defined its landscapes, history of human settlement, and modern economy. Increased heat and changes to rain and snowpack will send ripple effects throughout the region. Severe and sustained drought will stress water sources, already over-utilized in many areas, forcing increasing competition among farmers, energy producers, urban dwellers, and plant and animal life for the region’s most precious resource.

global-climate-change

Graphic Provided by globalchange.gov